Author Topic: Mixing it up  (Read 3254 times)

SuperDave

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Mixing it up
« on: January 04, 2015, 08:45:43 PM »
Who has had the courage to try different meats at the same time and will confess to it?  Pork ribs & a butt or beef short ribs and a brisket?  How was the amount of wood handled for smokes of varying meat that required different cook times?
Model 4, Harrisville, Utah

Barrel99

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2015, 10:35:03 PM »
Yesterday I smoked 2 racks of chicken wings which I had brined overnight and a rack of ribs in my #3. Ribs on top, chicken on racks 2 and 3. I used 4 oz of hickory (2 chunks of 2 oz) and smoked at 235 degrees. The wings I took out after 2.5 hours. They were done perfectly. Even the skin was edible, but I still put them in a 500 degree oven to crisp up. The ribs were done in 6 hours (tried 2.5,2.5,1). The smoke flavor and bark were perfect. I would not have made any changes except I think I still prefer the ribs without the foil and maybe 5.5 hours.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2015, 11:34:42 PM by Barrel99 »
Arnie near Fort Lauderdale, Florida

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DivotMaker

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2015, 10:13:16 PM »
Dave, I can say that, in all my smokes, I've never smoked 2 totally dissimilar meats at the same time.  And, here's why...I'm pretty particular when it comes to how my finished meat turns out.  When you try to smoke things that don't cook nearly the same, you introduce the possibility of a lot of error into the cook.  Lots of folks do what you're talking about, but to me, it's unacceptable.  Just my school of thought on it - no "right or wrong" way on the subject; just giving my 2.

If I need more than a pulled pork meal, or brisket, or ribs, etc..., I smoke them at different times, or one thing in the #1 and one thing in the #2 (I have the luxury of having 2).  I rely on getting each individual smoke as good as it can be, and a repeatable method; adding different meats to that takes out the predictability, and adds unneeded stress to the cook, in my view.  Definitely a "to each his own" thing, though!
Tony from NW Arkansas
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SuperDave

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2015, 11:42:06 PM »
Tony, it didn't take long to realize that you and I were really different in our approaches and I'm sure we both put out a quality product.  I've done catering events with multiple meats and smoked side dishes as opposed to a sole, single meat focus. Owning a fleet of smokers might be ideal but not real practical for me.
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NDKoze

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2015, 11:47:22 PM »
I guess I am with Tony on this one.

I smoke my main protein on the smoker and sides inside in the oven and/or on the stove.

But like you guys said, to each his own on this. With the #4 you have more real estate to work with, but I really don't like opening the door during my smokes.
Gregg - Fargo, ND
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Barrel99

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2015, 12:01:50 AM »
I haven't smoked anywhere near what you guys have. But in my limited experience so far I haven't found that opening the door for a short period has had much affect on the temperature. It is so well insulated it holds the heat very well and recovers quickly. Opening the door and dropping in an extra chunk of wood took a few seconds. Besides, in most cases the meats are measured by IT. Why should it be a problem to smoke many different meats, or side dishes unless the cooking temps are radically different? Of course I am not talking about opening the door frequently.
Arnie near Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Smokin-It #3, Landmann GSM Propane smoker, WEBER kettle, CharGrill Gas BBQ, Brinkman Gas/charcoal combo grill

1-is fun, 2-gets you through, 3-will set you free, 4-and you don't need no more...WAHOOOOOO!!!

SuperDave

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #6 on: January 06, 2015, 12:11:40 AM »
Gregg, you and Tony being veterans of the forum, you carry a lot of influence on new smokers. And for that reason, I'll just have to work extra hard to hold up the other side.
Model 4, Harrisville, Utah

NDKoze

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #7 on: January 06, 2015, 12:32:43 AM »
I think the main problem with opening the door is not the heat recovery time, but the loss of valuable moisture. Especially with the big heating element in the #3/#4 smokers, the units recover heat wise very quickly.

This isn't as big if a deal toward the end of a long Boston Butt smoke. But I think, it could have a bigger affect on shorter smokes like ribs. I don't have any empirical evidence of this. But I have seen several new smokers who were constantly fiddling with spritzing and mopping complain about bad results and I think the multiple door openings is what caused the problems.

I think if you limited your door opening to quick open/shutting of the door to add/remove food it may not be that big if a deal. But I just haven't really tried smoking things that get done at different times, so can't say for sure.
Gregg - Fargo, ND
Smokin-It #3 that has now replaced the Masterbuilt XL and 10+ Year-Old Big Chief. I also have a Weber Genesis Gas Grill, Weber Little Smokey at home and a Chargriller Deluxe (stick burner) and Camp Chef Three Burner Stove with Grill/Griddle out at the lake place.

Walt

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #8 on: January 06, 2015, 12:41:30 AM »
There are very few hard rules & by now you know most of them. 

When I started it was considered overkill to brine & inject briskets, now even Tony does it.  Some brined or injected but not both.  Many dont believe brineing beef adds value.  Ludicris!

I cook many sides alongside my protien & I dont think, with enough forethought & preparation, it has ANY negative effect on the main protien.  On more than one occasion, I have made complete dinners during one smoke (ex. Sausage, boudin, corn, potatoes & stuffed peppers).  A little common since should apply, everything indicated does real well @225 for 3 hours except the potatoes which needed a couple minutes in the microwave.  Not going to throw theses items in with a Butt to cook for 17 hrs.  Potatoes & ribs are a match made in heaven.  I have cooked ribs & a butt together.  Pulled the ribs quickly for dinner & let the butt roll on until complete.

As an old Captain once told me; If your flexable, your far to rigid, you mut be fluid!   Get the basics down & become proficient, then start experimenting with techniques & previously acquired skills.  You may strike out (alot) but you also may stumble upon something terriffic.

Don't be shy to experiment, just dont do it with quantities of instacure #1 or #2.  Many experiments have already settled issues for us like the absolute waste of useing foil for the Texas Crutch. 

Keep us posted of your failures as well as successes. 
Walt from South East Louisiana
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Pork Belly

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2015, 01:01:31 AM »
Nicely written Walt, I totally agree.
Brian - Michigan-NRA Life Member
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NDKoze

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2015, 01:38:01 AM »
Yep, Walt nailed it as usual. Very good points across the board.
Gregg - Fargo, ND
Smokin-It #3 that has now replaced the Masterbuilt XL and 10+ Year-Old Big Chief. I also have a Weber Genesis Gas Grill, Weber Little Smokey at home and a Chargriller Deluxe (stick burner) and Camp Chef Three Burner Stove with Grill/Griddle out at the lake place.

DivotMaker

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Re: Mixing it up
« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2015, 08:11:04 PM »
Very well-said, Walt!  Anyone who read my original post as some kind of "hard and fast rule" read it wrong - I was simply stating my way of approaching it.  There is absolutely nothing wrong with smoking different things, if that's what someone wants to do, and they're happy with the results!  Totally agree with Walt about using common sense as to what foods to combine, too. 

Experimentation and creativity changes everything! ;)
Tony from NW Arkansas
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Smokin-It Model 1, 2D conversion, and 3D
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